May 19, 2015

Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My!

By Ali Terrell
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Like Dorothy said, there is no place like home.   Fortunately the great staff at the GRD have made this extern feel right at home in DC.  From start to finish this has been a wonderful experience! I encourage you to consider applying!

As I reflect on the past four weeks I see a recurring theme: wildlife.  This is quite the coincidence because I had very little prior knowledge of this area of our profession.  Aside from a white tailed deer research project in undergrad and growing up with various critters, my experiences with wildlife are minimal.  However, I now consider myself to be well-versed on the issue of illegal wildlife trafficking.  First, a casual meeting with Dr.  Carrie La Jeunesse (AVMA/AAAS Fellow) turned into an invitation to a five hour AAAS symposium: Combating Wildlife Trafficking.  Here I learned the profound (to the tune of $10 billion) impact consumer demand is having on certain species such as the pangolin https://www.worldwildlife.org/species/pangolin, elephants, tigers, and rhinos.  An entire network exists from corrupt local governments and ivory stock piles to transport nodes and some East Asian elites.  The markets for products such as shark fins and elephant ivory exist in Asia where these products are status symbols, culinary delicacies, or they are used for medicinal purposes.  Needless to say every animal lover would be saddened by the statistics on poaching prevalence and population declines. Even more, imagine the threat this poses to food safety and public health.  At the conclusion of the symposium it was clear that this issue is far from resolution.

Fast forward a few days to the Association of Zoos and Aquariums Congressional Reception.  Some friends in the office relayed that this would be a great event with live animals! Needless to say, I arrived early.  The Rayburn Cafeteria was packed with staff and interns hoping to pet or get photos with the “animal ambassadors.” I met this nice spectacled owl in addition to an albino kangaroo kid, a two-toed sloth, a cheetah and her yellow labrador companion, and two young clouded leopards which are rarely seen in the wild.  We also were joined by a few members, including Congressman Fortenberry who shared his personal appreciation for zoos and aquariums.

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The final course in my DC wildlife education occurred at the National Zoo for monthly resident rounds. Dr. Colin McDermott spoke on cervid diseases, focusing on white tailed deer, a personal favorite. Though I am extremely proud of the brand new and beautiful University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital, I will say that listening to rounds at the zoo is a nice change of venue.  I encourage any visitor to make a trip to the National Zoo and any GRD extern to attend the resident rounds!

As I return to my beloved Peach State I will carry many great memories from my time as a GRD extern in DC. I am appreciative of the  many wonderful veterinarians who took the time to share their knowledge and advice with me. There are few places where you can have coffee with Dr. Erin Casey- Merial technical service veterinarian, lunch on a bench in Lafayette Square, afternoon meetings with Dr. Kathy Simmons- Chief Veterinarian at National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Mrs. Rachel Santos- Legislative Assistant for Senator Perdue, dinner with Hill friends, and then ride down the National Mall for an evening monuments tour. DC is such a special place!

 

I cannot say enough about the AVMA GRD and the  work they do for our profession. Veterinary students: please consider applying for the AVMA GRD Externship. I promise you won’t regret it and you will have so much fun! Thank you again to the GRD. I thoroughly enjoyed my time here!

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AVMA GRD Staff Appreciation Day at the Nationals Baseball Game!

May 4, 2015

And they’re off!

By Ali Terrell

horse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What a beautiful weekend it was in DC. I was able to enjoy the warm, sunny weather on Saturday at the races! Though I was a little far from Churchill Downs, the Virginia Gold Cup was the perfect compromise. The crowd consisted of ladies in colorful dresses, men in seersucker, and of course beautiful horses. Spectators joined together to cheer on the animal-athletes, which included some spunky Jack Russell Terriors in addition to the equines. I was able to join the Georgia State Society and some friends from the Hill.

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Also out of the gate are some very important pieces of legislation for the AVMA. For veterinary students in particular, the re-authorization of the Higher Education Act is something to pay attention to. Did you ever notice the origination fee that is deducted each time funds are dispersed? Did you ever wish you could refinance a student loan when lower interest rates are available (similar to refinancing your mortgage)? H.R. 1285 Eliminating the Hidden Student Loan Tax Act and H.R. 649 Student Loan Refinancing Act would address these concerns.

 

It is a busy and beautiful time to be in Washington. Everything is in bloom from tulips to bills! I am excited to see what this week has to in store.

tulips

“Ollioules” tulips flank the Smithsonian American Art Museum

 

April 29, 2015

Bright Lights, Big City

By Ali Terrell
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It is great to be back in DC! As an undergraduate in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, I was able to spend a summer working on the Hill as an agricultural fellow. It was during that time that I met with Dr. Anna Reddish, then Miss Anna Daniel, who was serving as an AVMA GRD extern. Anna was having a wonderful experience lobbying for veterinarians on the Hill, , mingling at fundraisers and receptions, and meeting with a variety of DVMs. Knowing I would soon be going to vet school at the University of Georgia, I made it a goal to also serve as an AVMA GRD extern. Four years later… here I am!

Having lived and worked on the Hill before, I am familiar with the grandeur that is the District of Columbia. Even so, I admit a pilomotor reflex (nerd for goosebumps) when the Capitol dome first came into view from my Uber car window. It is truly spectacular to see a building that is the symbol of the American people and our government, crowned with the Statue of Freedom.6501061061_281e163a05_z

Capitol at Night. Architect of the Capitol

I am proud to live in a country whose citizens are extended an open invitation to participate in the political process. Whether you are here to lobby for Georgia peanut farmers like my friend Jessie Bland does on occasion, or visiting to honor our veterans at the Honor Flight, or you are a high school student working as a Senate Page, there is truly something for everyone.

For the next four weeks I look forward to exercising my right to advocate for our profession in this great city! Patriotism aside, the food is reason enough to visit.

April 22, 2015

Toxicoses in the gardens

By Elizabeth Francis
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As my time here is wrapping up, I think I will probably do a series of short blog posts on topics that at one point I was considering spending a lot of time on. So first up, here’s a short bit on toxicology inspired by my trip to the National Botanical Gardens (possibly one of my favorite places in DC!). I hope I do The Antidote proud.

Sorghum spp.

 

While walking through an exhibit on roots and root structure, I spied my first toxic plant! It was Johnson grass (aka perennial sudan, aka sorghum)! Look at those roots- amiright!? As any vet student will tell you, sorghum species are toxic by two mechanisms- they contain cyanogenic glycosides and nitrate/nitrite. Horses, cattle and sheep are the primary species affected, and toxicosis is most common in the southwest USA. Clinical signs include incoordination progressing to ataxia and flaccid paralysis. Look out for this one, guys!

 

Cocoa tree

Cocoa tree

 

Later as I was wandering around I saw a tall, beautiful, weird looking tree with big yellow fruits hanging off the trunk. The sign proclaimed “Theobroma cocoa”- the cocoa tree. It is fitting that a tree called Theobroma would be full of theobromines, which is the toxic part of chocolate and other cocoa products. The most common species affected is obviously dogs, who commonly eat things that aren’t even food so I guess we should cut them a break for getting into chocolate. Common clinical signs are vomiting, tachycardia, arrhythmias, tremors, hyperthermia, seizures and death. This is a super common toxicity (my dog got into some a few months ago!), but that doesn’t mean it’s not serious. Take your dog to the vet if you notice they’ve gotten into any!

 

Taxus, aka yew

Say “taxus toxicosis” 10 times, fast

 

The last plant I’ll tell you about is the most common plant around- you’ve probably seen it today. It probably grows by your work or school, or outside of your grandma’s house. It’s EVERYWHERE. It’s yew.

Taxus spp. are small coniferous shrubs who’s small elliptical leaves are toxic to all species. The most common species affected are cattle, but other herbivores are not uncommon. Death can come suddenly or can occur a day or two after ingestion. Symptoms include ataxia, diarrhea, hypotension, colic, hypothermia, coma, seizures, weakness, respiratory failure, bradycardia and sudden death. Oftentimes there will be no clinical signs apparent, except a dead animal in the vicinity of a yew bush with possible evidence of foraging.

It’s very dramatic.

 

Look out folks, toxic plants are out there!

April 22, 2015

Biodefense panel tackles disaster response and recovery

By Elizabeth Francis
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On April 1st, 2015, the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense convened its fourth and final session, hearing from expert witnesses on emergency response and recovery issues at both the national and state levels. While many topics were discussed, the overarching theme that emerged from the testimonies was that disaster response, regardless of the type of disaster, is a collaborative effort between many parties and that good communication is essential in successfully handling response efforts for both humans and animals.

The session was split into five panels: pre-event activities and emergency response; public health response; pharmaceutical response; recovery and mitigation; and leadership. Before the session began, Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) spoke about the states’ roles in disaster response and the media’s response. Dr. Irwin Redlener, a professor of health policy and management at Columbia University and the director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, spoke during the lunch session on the challenges of disaster response, such as limited funding and how our decentralized government makes effective planning difficult.

From a veterinary perspective, the most interesting testimony came from Melissa Hersh, a critical infrastructure consultant and CEO of Hersh Consulting. She reminded the panel that even though most emergencies deal with human health issues, it is important to keep in mind the importance of protecting herd health. She indicated that most policies place high priority on treating sick individuals, as opposed to isolating or decontaminating them, which can be problematic in a contagious disease situation despite being more popular from a humanitarian view.

As an example, Hersh discussed the potential bio-threat from Brucellosis, which is a zoonotic disease carried by elk in western states and has begun to make a recurrence in bison and cattle populations. This zoonotic disease has the potential to cause severe economic loss and is dangerous to those exposed, but yet, the agencies tasked with managing the threat have been playing a game of “hot potato,” she said.  Because of the high risks involved in managing this disease, Hersh highlighted the need for response and action before the situation deteriorates. She indicated that when prevention is possible, it is important to take steps to minimize the dangers of a bio-event so that disaster can be avoided.

While most of the discussion centered on human health issues, the panel provided important insight into disaster readiness and recovery. Although I may be biased, I think more time and discussion should have been spent on issues affecting our vulnerable agriculture rather than just on the preparation of hospital beds and expedited vaccine development. While these are certainly important aspects of disaster response, I believe that a veterinary voice is needed to help direct discussion in order to develop a broadened response, which includes livestock management.

The Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense began in December 2014 and will identify and recommend changes to U.S. policy and law to strengthen national biodefense while optimizing resource investments. It plans to issue it report sometime in the spring of this year. For more information, visit the panel’s website.

April 14, 2015

Let’s talk about the white female elephant in the room…

By Elizabeth Francis

That’s right; I’m talking about diversity, or rather our lack thereof. In November of 2013 The Atlantic declared the veterinarian the “whitest job” in the US at 97% white. And as the number of women in the profession continues to grow, male veterinarians continue to be far more likely to take on leadership roles in student organizations, VMA’s and in practices.

Yesterday I sat down with Lisa Greenhill, who is the associate director for institutional research and diversity at the AAVMC (Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges- the association that brought you VMCAS and the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education). We talked about barriers into vet school for people of color, the LGBT community, the disabled and other minority groups. Obviously a diverse community is a strong community, and ideally the veterinary population would reflect the diversity of the public we serve. So what can we do to welcome more people into the fold?

Well the diversity initiative at AAVMC has taken steps to do just that- and since the initiative began in 2005 the number of racially/ethnically underrepresented students has grown 90%. The first step in supporting underrepresented students is to understand the climate at in institution. In 2011 all vet students were asked to complete a survey which asked about their experiences and interactions with other students, faculty, and staff. It was discovered that nearly a third of racial/ethnic minority students had experienced racism, mostly from other students. Similarly, 20% of LGBT students reported hearing homophobic slurs in the academic setting. These unwelcoming environments contribute to lower retention rates for these students and less representation in our profession.

Another barrier to entry into the profession for minorities is simple geography. The only vet school that is part of a historically black University is Tuskegee, where POC make up a much higher percent of the class than in other programs. Additionally, in certain areas of the country it may be harder to recruit people of color onto the faculty simply because the culture of that area is perceived as unwelcoming.

I know that this is an unpopular area of discussion, but I think it is an important one. When I walk from main campus over to our CVM at Missouri, I am shocked by the difference between the groups of students. I want vets to be an integrated part of the communities they work in, no matter what that community looks like.

For more info on the diversity initiative, check out: http://www.aavmc.org/Programs-and-Initiatives/Diversity.aspx

April 14, 2015

Lessons from APHIS

By Elizabeth Francis

At this point I’ve been in DC about two weeks, and am settling into a little routine- or at least getting used to the lack thereof. Congress was on recess, so getting started has been a little bit slow, but it’s given me a good chance to meet a lot of vets around town and get some exploring done. DC is BEAUTIFUL right now- the cherry trees are blooming, along with what seems like every other flower. It is a great time to be here!

Last Wednesday however the weather was gross (raining in the 50′s), and so I was glad to be tucked up inside all day at USDA- APHIS. I met with 11 different veterinarians there, who are involved in all kinds of interesting things! I met with people who helped regulate the import and export of animals- which is apparently much more complicated than you would think. However when you spend time working on importing exotic species for zoos you are rewarded with cute pictures of their offspring later, so it’s not entirely thankless. I also met with vets who were involved with emergency response and preparedness, tracability of diseases (such as brucellosis and tuberculosis), BSE management, scrapie eradication, and more! The vets had landed in government work for a lot of different reasons, but all seemed really happy to be there.

The vets of APHIS are very passionate people, and gave me amazing advice as a student and as a young doctor. Many of them told me to discover what I was passionate about, and to do what I love. It’s hard to convey in text how moving and honestly emotional it was to hear these vets talk about finding their passion in life and encourage me to find my own. So get out there, young doctors! Discover what excites you and move forward with your dreams! And most importantly- remember that it’s people that matter in the long run.

March 22, 2015

Lessons Learned

By Michael White

AAVMCMy extern-mate Anita has dutifully attended the blog until now and I am eternally grateful. Thank you, Anita! Rather than revisit material already covered, I thought it would be more meaningful to share some recurring themes that I’ve identified during our adventures in the nation’s capitol.

  1. It’s really difficult to exact change in Washington. Many people want to laud this reality as testament to our elaborate system of checks and balances, but I would argue that when Congress grinds to a screeching halt (or worse, when both parties begin to subvert each other), our government ceases to satisfy its core function. Congressional efficiency historically ebbs and flows, but we are at an all-time low: the 113th Congress was the least productive in recent history, passing a mere 3% of proposed legislation (a far cry from the 6-7% average over the last 65 years). Although the concept of bipartisanship appears universally accepted, concrete examples of “reaching across the aisle” seem few and far between. Consider the House Republican’s letter to Iranian ayatollahs or President Obama’s executive order regarding amnesty – these are not actions indicative of a government that hopes to work together to exact meaningful change. How did we get here? Surely that topic is hotly debated, but I think it boils down to a period of economic recession and an inflammatory, omnipresent media. In this kind of environment, even a Republican like Mitch McConnell (R-TN), who has dutifully towed the party line for over 30 years, can be condemned by Tea Partyists for “waffling” under pressure from the President, the economy, and the entire American public during the economic shutdown last year.
  2. While the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbs toward historic highs and Janet Yellen is training Congress to prepare for rate hikes, the average American still feels like we are in an economic recession. Financial resources are limited and the government continues to argue over the best way to allocate diminishing funds. When resources are scarce, strategic and targeted spending becomes even more important. Unfortunately, the opposite is true in the current political landscape. Rather than anticipate problems and safeguard against them, the legislation that passes is “often reactionary and over-reaching” (in the words of Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI). At the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense, Dr. Julie Gerberding (former director of the CDC, now with Merck) echoed these sentiments. She emphasized the need to invest in preventive programs aimed at curtailing major threats to our national security, rather than simply react when an affront occurs. Dr. Gerberding described the U.S. government’s collective, strong and unified response to the Ebola outbreak as an example of when all parties worked together harmoniously, but argued that the outbreak itself may have been avoided with better disease monitoring programs. (Notably, Dr. Gerberding also highlighted agroterrorism as a threat to national security that warrants as much attention as biomedical warfare aimed at human populations.)
  3. As an Economics major at the University of Virginia, I remember studying John Williamson’s “Washington Consensus,” a set of ten, neatly devised economic policies that could resolve insolvency and economic upheaval in developing countries. Long story short, these “one-size-fits-all” policies did not work as expected and their efficacy is still hotly contested today. That lesson seems to have hit home with the policymakers we’ve met these past weeks. At the Farm Foundation Forum, Stephan Polasky (Professor of Ecological and Environmental Economics, Univ. of Minnesota) and Jerry Flint (VP, Dupont Pioneer) underscored the importance of constructing relief programs that incorporate the unique sociocultural customs of each targeted demographic. In particular, Flint emphasized the importance of articulating the benefits of GMOs to societies that are reticent to accept them (likely due to the varied and widespread misconceptions that surround the acronym). Suffice to say, a panacea does not exist and there is no “quick fix” to universally address the issues facing our society or those of our world neighbors. Rather, in an atmosphere where each dollar of discretionary spending is meaningful, outlays should be tailored and incorporate the specific needs of those they are intended to benefit.
  4. It’s really difficult to exact change in Washington. (Have I said that already?). Acknowledging that our profession consists predominantly of Type A personalities, I find myself asking a lot of veterinarians around the Hill: “how do you reconcile your inherent drive for progress with the barriers you face every day?” The response from people like Gina Luke (Associate Director, AVMA-GRD), Gerald Rushin (Veterinary Medical Officer, USDA-APHIS Animal Care), Michelle Colby (Agriculture Defense Branch Chief, DHS) and others is that when you genuinely believe in the positive change for which you are campaigning, fatigue is not a factor. In fact, said Kevin Cain at the AAVMC: when the bill you’ve poured your heart and soul into finally passes, it makes the victory that much sweeter.

Acknowledging what I’ve written above, I often find myself thinking ‘I probably don’t want your job, but I sure am happy there’s someone like you here doing it.’ No truer words have been written. If nothing else, this experience has taught me that there is a legion of capable, dedicated, and altruistic people undertaking very challenging and sometimes thankless work on behalf of our profession. Regardless of where a veterinarian lies along the political spectrum, we should all be thankful for the sacrifices these advocates make for the betterment of our profession every day.

March 22, 2015

Visit from the USAHA

By Michael White
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On 17 March, key members of the United States Animal Health Association (USAHA) joined AVMA-GRD leadership to discuss issues and priorities pertinent to appropriations season in Washington, D.C.

When meeting with the Animal Agriculture Coalition, hot topics included the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Enhancement Act (VMLRPEA), support for the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), and the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS).

VMLRPEA would remove the steep 39% withholding tax associated with the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program, an initiative that places highly qualified veterinarians in rural communities to provide much needed veterinary care to underserved areas. Since 2003, this program has placed over 280 veterinarians in areas that would otherwise go without veterinary services; had the 39% tax not been withheld, an additional 100 veterinarians (and communities) would have been benefited from the program.

NAHLN is part of a nationwide effort to track and address animal disease outbreaks. The NAHLN brings together numerous organizations and laboratories strategically located throughout the United States to more efficiently and expediently respond to disease threats. Unfortunately, the President’s budget did not provide any funding for this strategic initiative.

What the President did prioritize was a massive $1+ billion budget across government agencies to address the breadth and impact of antibiotic resistance. While members of today’s meetings were supportive of efforts to combat and prevent antibiotic resistance, there was concern that the magnitude of this outlay necessarily diminished funding for other important projects (such as the NAHLN).

Additional information:

VMLRPEA: https://www.avma.org/Advocacy/National/Congress/Pages/VMLRPEA-Advocacy-Campaign.aspx

NAHLN: https://www.nahln.org/

March 16, 2015

Biodefense: Surveillance and Detection

By Anita Richert

We had a very full day Thursday. We started out by attending the first panel of the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense: Surveillance and Detection. The study panel included members such as Tom Ridge, Kenneth Wanstein, Jim Greenwood, Donna Shalala, and Joseph Lieberman. Their objective was to gather information from qualified members of the intellectual community to put together some long- and short-term recommendations for Congress regarding biosecurity. The event started with Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) addressing the panel on his perspective. He stated that he thought the risk bioterrorism poses is a greater threat than even  cyberterrorism because of the immediate and severe consequences as a result of each and every attack. He proposes that we increase our sense of urgency because of the increased ease of access to materials and methods to build bioweapons. He also encouraged them to ask Congress not only to prepare themselves for the possibility of physical damage an attack could result in, but also the psychological damage. He talked in length about the challenges of addressing biosecurity as a topic, including the fact that the issue is touched on by so many different committees in Congress that one, single unanimous decision or plan will be challenging to form.

Next, we heard from the panel on The Biosurveillance and Detection Landscape. The panel including Dr. Julie Gerberding (Executive Vice President for Strategic Communications, Global Public Policy and Population Health, Merck; former Director of CDC), Dr. Julie Fischer (Associate Research Professor, Department of Health Policy, George Washington University), and Dr. Norm Kahn (Consultant, Counter-BIO LCC; former Director, Intelligence Community Counter-Biological Weapons Program).  They talked about the need to put into place a plan that included funding to national laboratories responsible for surveillance and preventative research consistently, and not just ramping them up when there is an outbreak or crisis. The surveillance would need to not only need to be consistent but also in context with the surrounding animal, social, and cultural environment.

An interesting discussion that arouse was that of the ‘lone wolf,’ an individual who initiates an attack without support from a group. The main concept was the degree in which intent of action and ability meet to create the greatest threat. Dr. Kahn spoke about the need to create a culture of moral obligation in students and researchers in the field of biology to encourage the ‘bystander’ to be more willing to alert authority to a threat created by one single individual.

The part of the discussion that piqued my interest the most as a future member of the research community was the panel encouraging the increase in funding to ‘high risk’ research and not just ‘sure result’ research. While there will be many failures along the way, this is one of the only ways to make significant progress and major discoveries.

At the very end of the discussion they noted that biosurveillance needs to account for the agricultural industry as well as for human pathogens because an attack/outbreak in either crops or animal agriculture would be devastating to the industry and ultimately the national economy. The lunch keynote speaker was going to further elaborate on the human-animal interface, however due to our very full schedule we were not able to attend. I am hopeful however that they will not disregard issues such as high pathogenic avian influenza, just because it is not infectious to humans.

Blue Ribbon Panel: Donna Shalala, Tom Ridge, Joseph Liberman, Kenneth Wanstein, Jim Greenwood

Blue Ribbon Panel: Donna Shalala, Tom Ridge, Joseph Liberman, Kenneth Wanstein, Jim Greenwood